Filtering By

lecture X X
Mar 06, 2018

Having lived and worked fluidly between three different cities (New York, Miami, and his hometown of Lima, Peru), William Cordova creates artwork that deals with his real-life issues of transition and displacement. . . . Often site-specific, Cordova’s installations challenge preexisting histories of the places they occupy and present new perspectives on the fleeting significance of his subjects. Artsy, “William Cordova: Biography”

Feb 27, 2018

I think you and I both fell hard for Jeff Shore and Jon Fisher’s room, which is motion-activated, and the sound aspect of it is crucial. Though they’re also the ones who completely obliterated their cylinder by building a square video projection room inside it. Those guys are so, so good. Christina Rees in “A Conversation About Art and the Silos on Sawyer,” Rainey Knudson and Christina Rees, Glasstire, October 30, 2017

Feb 20, 2018

Awareness can feel like a bright island in an ocean of namelessness. The unthought and the unseen wash the shores, leaching into the ground of the mind under sagging frames of reference. There is endless erosion of the coastline, a subversive give-and-take. Objects are soaked with feelings and their identities compromised. Abstractions are contaminated. “Land” in Land, ed. Carroll Dunham (New York: Nolan/Eckman Gallery, 1989). Reprinted in Into Words: The Selected Writings of Carroll Dunham

Feb 13, 2018

Ron Mueck’s hyper-real sculptures of the human figure are tender portrayals of people in their most intimate, isolated and vulnerable moments. Manchester Art Gallery on the 2008 ARTIST ROOMS exhibition featuring the work of Ron Mueck

Feb 06, 2018


Michael Auping is one of the most significant curators of our generation. Through his exhibitions and writings, he has chronicled many of the leading artists of the last decades—often producing definitive treatments on artists from Lucian Freud, Georg Baselitz, and Anselm Kiefer to Frank Stella, Susan Rothenberg, and Bruce Nauman. Auping’s “secret sauce” is his ability to enter the minds and lives of artists, thus grasping not only the artwork itself but its conception, process, and facture. Adam Weinberg, Alice Pratt Brown Director, Whitney Museum of American Art

Nov 14, 2017

This captivating installation by Hubbard & Birchler, which supports an impossible dialogue between an elderly son and his young mother, is an impressive example of how “rephrasing” and “rewriting” histories can carry an emotional impact. Claire Walsh, “Notes from Venice,” MAP, August 4, 2017

Nov 09, 2017

Paddy Johnson is the Founding Editor of the blog Art F City.

Nov 07, 2017

Generally I think my work is the research I do. Minerva Cuevas, “Bridging Borders: Minerva Cuevas,” Extended Play, Art21, March 24, 2017

Oct 24, 2017

A founding Principal of Kennedy & Violich Architecture Ltd. (KVA), Kennedy has been designated as one of Fast Company’s Masters of Design, described as an “insightful and original thinker who is designing new ways of working, learning, leading and innovating.” MITei news release

Oct 17, 2017

Booksigning at 6 pm.

Is any art that depicts a vivid sense of doom and gloom immediately relevant in 2017? Yes, if Robyn O’Neil’s current solo exhibition The Good Herd is any indication. Previously, the Los Angeles-based artist’s dark surrealism felt like an anachronism. Her drawings in exhibitions like 2011’s Hell were, at once, a throwback to Odilon Redon’s trippy drawings and Edward Gorey’s Goth wit.  Emily Colucci, “You Want It Darker: Robyn O’Neil’s ‘The Good Herd’ at Susan Inglett Gallery,” Art F City, February 23, 2017