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Mar 20, 2018

Soon after Roy Lichtenstein’s Pop paintings exploded on the art scene in the 1960s, observers grew curious about the popular roots of his work. Critics, curators, and scholars began to trace his borrowed imagery back to the comic books, newspapers, and other commercial printed media from which it came. Michael Lobel

Mar 27, 2018

Over the last few years, Kamrooz Aram’s paintings have sought to rehabilitate the status of ornament and pattern within modernist aesthetics. Challenging the epithet ‘decorative’, Aram uses ornament conceptually.
Murtaza Vali, “Kamrooz Aram: Recollections for a Room,” ArtReview Asia

Apr 03, 2018

“The work’s a combination of radicalism and humanism,” she says. “When I stand in front of these paintings, it forces me to be there in a way I recognize as essential to my well-being.” Artist Roni Horn quoted in Howie Kahn, “Home Is Where the Art Is: The Ryman Family,” Wall Street Journal, November 17, 2015

Apr 10, 2018

Bradford’s figures are all generically human yet singular in their execution, as if they tripped out of the brush and landed in unpredictable ways. As a fulcrum to build and drive her storylines, she uses the goofy little things that paint and accidental shapes can do. And hidden in her cavalier brushwork are wise and focused decisions.

Michael Frank Blair, “Katherine Bradford at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth,” Glasstire, December 9, 2017