January 24, 2012

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth Presents
Spring 2012 Tuesday Evenings Lecture Series

This popular series of lectures and presentations by artists, architects, historians, and critics is free and open to the public. To assure seating, free admission tickets can be picked up at the Modern’s admission desk beginning at 5 pm on the day of the lecture. Seating begins at 6:30 pm and is limited to 250. A live broadcast of the lectures is shown in Cafë Modern for any additional guests. Lectures begin at 7 pm. The Museum galleries and the caf� remain open until 7 pm on Tuesday evenings during the series.

Revisit the insightful lectures from the Tuesday Evenings series with the Modern Podcasts. Visit www.themodern.org or subscribe to our podcasts on iTunes or by using the RSS feed in your preferred program.

Tuesday Evenings Cocktails and Light Bites
Guests can enjoy refreshments from 5 to 7 pm in Café Modern before Tuesday Evenings lectures. Choose from Café Modern’s unique cocktail menu or distinctive wine list. Coffee, tea, and light snacks are also available.


February 7
For this Tuesday Evenings presentation, artist Glenn Ligon is in conversation with curator Scott Rothkopf on the subject of Ligon’s midcareer retrospective Glenn Ligon: AMERICA. Ligon is one of the most important American artists working today, with work spanning painting, sculpture, photography, and film, and exhibitions throughout the United States and Europe, including the 1991 and 1993 Whitney Biennials; Black Male: Representations of Masculinity in Contemporary Art and The American Century: Art and Culture 1900-2000, both at the Whitney; solo exhibitions at the Studio Museum in Harlem; the Kunstverein M�nchen, Germany; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; St. Louis Art Museum, Missouri; ICA in Philadelphia; and SFMOMA; as well as the 1997 Venice Biennale and Documenta II. Rothkopf is curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art and curator of Glenn Ligon: AMERICA. Prior to his position at the Whitney, Rothkopf was senior editor at Artforum. Through both positions, Rothkopf has come to know Ligon and his art well, having worked closely with the artist on this retrospective and as editor of Ligon’s book Yourself in the World: Selected Writings and Interviews. Given Ligon and Rothkopf’s relationship, as well as their obvious insight into the exhibition, this is a very special presentation that also serves as a preview for Glenn Ligon: AMERICA,which opens to the public on Sunday, February 12.

February 14
Andrew Campbell is an art historian and senior lecturer at Texas State University, where he teaches courses on contemporary art, feminism and visual representation, bad taste, film, and graphic novels. For Tuesday Evenings, Campbell presents one facet of his current project, Bound Together, an academic study of gay and lesbian leather communities in the 1970s. In this Valentine’s Day presentation entitled The Practice of Sex, the Work of History/ the Work of Sex, the Practice of History, Campbell--in an effort to engage in the ongoing project of writing contemporary art histories by making sense of a multitude of artists and their practice(s) as well as the expansion of historical LGBTQ visual cultures and communities that might otherwise be deemed too esoteric or stigmatized for study--presents four contemporary artists/collectives (Christian Holstad, Monica Majoli, Dean Sameshima, and A. K. Burns/A. L. Steiner) who refashion source documents from 1970s leather communities in order to comment on the politicized practices of LGBTQ love and sex in the twenty-first century.

*Audience members should note that to fully explore and present his subject, Campbell’s presentation includes mature language, themes, and subject matter.

February 21
Tim Rollins is an artist, activist, and teacher based in South Bronx, New York, who is known for what might be understood as “art activism,” and specifically his collaborative work with a group of at-risk students who call themselves Kids of Survival (K.O.S.). Beginning his career in 1980 as cofounder of Group Material—a collective of young New York artists pooling resources to launch exhibitions that address social themes--Rollins laid the ground work for what has become an art-world phenomenon known as Tim Rollins and K.O.S. Moving from traditional student/teacher interactions to a respected fine art collaborative practice, Tim Rollins and K.O.S. is represented by Lehman Maupin gallery in New York and shows internationally, with an exhibition history that includes two Whitney Biennials, the 1988 Venice Biennale, Carnegie International, as well as Documenta 8. After showing at the Museum f�r Gegenwartskunst in Basel, Switzerland, more than 20 years ago, Tim Rollins and K.O.S. present new works in a major survey exhibition in Basel entitled On Transfiguration, on view January 21 through April 15, 2012.“With Rollins’s guidance, these students are producing artwork of a remarkable sophistication, which refuses to conform to known categories but alternates between the literary and the visual, the modern and the na�ve. Rollins’s teaching approach is at once classic and iconoclastic, for he uses significant works of literature as the basis for a visual statement. The result is a multilevel collaboration: among the students, between teacher and student, between the group and the authors whose books they choose.” Roberta Smith, New York Times.

This Tuesday Evenings presentation, Art and the Beloved Community, offers a special opportunity to hear from Rollins on the history, experiences, and initiatives of this extraordinary group.

February 28
Katie Paterson is a young British artist receiving a great deal of attention as a cross-medium, multidisciplinary, and conceptually driven artist who focuses on nature, ecology, geology, and cosmology in her work, using her skill and knowledge as an artist together with her limitless curiosity and tireless research to probe matters often left to science. Her devotion and hard work have been rewarded. Paterson recently held the 2010-2011 John Florent Stone Fellowship at Edinburgh College of Art and the 2010-2011 Leverhulme Artist in Residence in the Astrophysics Group at the University College London, as well as recently being named one of four “Best New Artists in Britain” by The Observer of London. In addition, in 2008 she was the recipient of the first annual Creative 30 Award. With work that literally explores the universe and presents its various phenomena, Paterson has been acknowledged and championed by fellow British artist Cornelia Parker in a 2010 article for The Guardian as, “original, engaging, and expansive. She makes us realize how inconsequential we are in relation to the universe.” Described in the same article as, “a romantic . . . with the patience, curiosity, and technical persistence of a scientist,” Paterson first came to public attention with a solo show at Modern Art Oxford in 2008, a year after graduating from the Slade School of Fine Art in London. She has since shown in group and solo exhibitions from London to Seoul, Korea to Venice, where in 2011 she presented the unique and fascinating project 100 Billion Suns during the Venice Biennale.

For Tuesday Evenings, Paterson shares her experiences and ideas as an artist, offering special insight into her work featured in the Modern’s FOCUS: Katie Paterson, as well as what to look forward to from her growing career.

March 6
Jill Magid, a New York-based artist and writer, seeks platforms for working inside and outside of institutions, responding to their imposition, negotiation, and at times, capitulation of power. For Magid, this power is not a remote condition to contest, but rather something to manipulate by drawing it closer, exploiting its loopholes, engaging it in dialogue, seducing its agents, revealing its sources, infiltrating its structure, and repeating its logic. As an artist and writer, Magid is fascinated by the topics of hidden information; being public as a condition for existence; and intimacy in relation to power. With solo exhibitions at institutions around the world, including Tate Modern, London; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Berkeley Museum of Art, California; Tate Liverpool; the Stedelijk Museum Bureau Amsterdam; Yvon Lambert, Paris and New York; Gagosian Gallery, New York; the Centre d’Art Santa M�nica, Barcelona; and at the Security and Intelligence Agency of the Netherlands, Magid has been recognized with awards such as the Basis Stipendium from Fonds Voor Beeldende Kunsten in the Netherlands and the Netherland-America Foundation Fulbright Fellowship. She is also the author of four books, including Becoming Tarden, which opens with, “The secret itself is much more beautiful than its revelation.” In accordance with Magid’s proclivity for intrigue, this book is as mysterious as the project it is associated with, which included the book being edited, censored, and its contents confiscated by the Dutch Secret Service, and a one-time-only exhibition of the novel at Tate Modern last fall.

For Tuesday Evenings, Magid presents Jill Magid: Embedded, a survey of the artist’s career with insights into her strange and thrilling experiences and endeavors as an artist, including her next project, Failed States,at Arthouse and AMOAin Austin, which is also the subject of Magid’s fourth and upcoming book by the same title.

For more information about Jill Magid, visit www.jillmagid.net.

March 13
Brooklyn-based artist Byron Kim is known for his monochrome paintings, born out of representation, that seemingly challenge their relationship to abstraction. Faye Hirsch describes his work in an interview with the artist for Art in America, “You see subtle variations of color within the fields. Recalling paintings by midcentury modernists like Rothko and Reinhardt, they feel like pure abstraction, but as always with Kim, have profound ties to the world.” Recognized in the early 1990s for Synecdoche, a grouping of hundreds of small monochrome paintings based on skin tones that was included in the 1993 Whitney Biennial, Kim collaborated that same year with friend and fellow artist Glenn Ligon on the painting Black and White, which exploits the notion of “flesh tone” as a color. Kim has since moved to meditations on the sky with his ongoing Sunday Paintings (a series begun in 2001). These small and stunning presentations of the daytime sky are immediately personal, with notations from mundane to profound, that mark the moment they represent written across their surfaces while at the same time thoughtfully reference the historical Today Series by On Kawara. Kim’s devotion to his paintings and their subjects has brought him critical acclaim; he has received numerous awards, including the Alpert Award in the Arts, UCROSS, and the Joan Mitchell Foundation Grant. His work has been the subject of numerous solo and group exhibitions throughout the United States and abroad, including Korea, Poland, Spain, the United Kingdom, Germany, and Canada.

For Tuesday Evenings, Kim presents the ideas and experiences that have formed his work.

March 27
Andrea Fraser is an artist currently based in Los Angeles, California, where she is a professor at UCLA in the department of art. She also serves as visiting faculty for the Whitney Independent Study Program in New York. Fraser has used performance, video, and a range of other media to explore the motivations that drive artists, collectors, art dealers, corporate sponsors, museum trustees, and museum visitors from the pursuit of prestige to that of financial investment, to sexual fantasy and self-realization. Working since the mid-1980s, Fraser has built on the site-specific and research-based approaches that emerged with conceptualism, combining them with feminist investigations of subjectivity and desire. Her methods are rooted in the psychoanalytic principle that one can only engage structures and relationships through the immediacy of performance. In addition, Fraser also writes about her observations and experiences in art and life. Moved by a personal and immediate engagement with Fred Sandback’s work at Dia: Beacon in 2004, she wrote the essay, “Why does Fred Sandback’s Work Make Me Cry.”

For Tuesday Evenings, Fraser presents and discusses this moving essay that explores the psychological and emotional aspects of our relationship with art and museums.

April 3
Writer and artist Gregg Bordowitz presents Testing Some Beliefs, an ongoing series of lectures/performances that consider the strength and longevity, as well as the present relevancy, of some personal and collective beliefs. Currently the Chair of the film, video, new media, and animation department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and faculty at the Whitney Independent Study Program, Bordowitz is known for his work as an AIDS activist in the 1980s and 1990s, as well as his socially conscious, thoughtful, and poetic performance-based work. Throughout his career, he has been recognized with awards and grants, including the 2006 Frank Jewitt Mather Award for The AIDS Crisis Is Ridiculous and Other Writings 1986-2003, a Rockefeller Intercultural Arts Fellowship, and a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship. Of Testing Some Beliefs, Bordowitz writes, “I believe that art can change the world. I believe that art and freedom are necessarily related. There are no facts to support these claims. Still, I carry these beliefs formed decades ago. How do some beliefs remain and what do I gain by believing? At the risk of sounding ridiculous, I will try to explain.”

For more information on Gregg Bordowitz, visit www.greggbordowitz.com.

April 10
Gary Rough is a Scottish conceptual artist based in New York who represented his homeland in the 2003 Venice Biennale. As described in the press release for a recent solo show at numberthirtyfive gallery, New York, Rough “has cast himself as the antihero in his own dystopian novel.” Rough scrupulously labors to report upon the fragility, pathos, and beauty of the human condition, evoking the romantic, mundane, bleak, and intimate in paintings, sculpture, text, T-shirts, site-specific installations, and more with work that appears to be cobbled together in a deceptively hurried and craftless manner. It is no surprise that Rough was attracted to Kurt Vonnegut’s character Rabo Karabekian, the fictional and failed Abstract Expressionist painter whose paintings faded and disappeared from their canvases in Bluebeard due to a combination of stupidity and bad luck. After working with the author, in 2007, the year of Vonnegut’s death, Rough recreated and showed Karabekian’s “Sateen-Dura Luxe” paintings, at Fergus McCaffrey Fine Art, New York, based on Vonnegut’s descriptions of them in the book. This exercise, and the remarkable resulting paintings, brought Rough critical acclaim and an intriguing relationship with Vonnegut and his widow. Rough continues to explore the ordinary and often pathetic experiences and conditions of life on earth with tenderness and extraordinary astuteness. For Tuesday Evenings, he shares the insights and revelations of his career thus far.

April 17
Lucy Lippard is a distinguished writer, curator, editor, lecturer, and activist who has long been appreciated for her expansive scholarship and insight, having been one of the first to recognize the dematerialization of the work in art’s movement toward conceptualism as well as an early champion of feminist art. The author of 21 books, curator of 50 exhibitions, cofounder of Printed Matter Inc., the Heresies Collective, Political Art Documentation/Distribution, Artists Call Against U.S. Intervention in Central America, and other artists’ organizations, Lippard has received eight honorary doctorates in fine arts as well as numerous awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Frank Jewett Mather Award for Criticism, two National Endowment for the Arts grants in criticism, the Women’s Caucus for Art (WCA) Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Bard College Award for Curatorial Excellence. Of Lippard’s book, The Lure of the Local: Senses of Place in a Multicentered Society, Thomas Hine wrote for the New York Times Book Review, “Lippard overwhelms us with the breadth of her reading and the comprehensiveness with which she considers the things that define place. . . . In its final section, The Lure of the Local is revealed as a sort of art book after all. Its intent is to explore the many things that those who make art or who make judgments about art should think about when they consider art that seeks to be ‘contextual,’ ‘site-specific,’ or ‘place making’.” Lippard’s most recent book is Down Country: The Tano of the Galisteo Basin 1250-1782, for which she received the Caroline Bancroft History Prize from the Denver Public Library.

For Tuesday Evenings, Lippard presents Undermining, touching on photography, the new West, development, water, and land art, as she discusses pits and erections (gravel pits and skyscrapers), and more.


Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth
3200 Darnell Street
Fort Worth, Texas 76107
Telephone 817.738.9215
Toll-Free 1.866.824.5566
Fax 817.735.1161

Museum Gallery Hours
Tue 10 am–7 pm (Feb-Apr, Sep-Nov)
Wed-Sun 10 am–5 pm
Fri 10 am–8 pm

General Admission Prices (includes special exhibition)
$4 for students with ID and seniors (60+)
$10 for adults ($13+)
Free for children 12 and under
Free for Modern members
Free every Wednesday and the first Sunday of every month

Tue-Fri 11 am-2:30 pm
Sat-Sun10 am-3 pm
Fri 5-10 pm
Coffee, snacks, and dessert
10 am-4:30 pm

The Museum is closed Monday and holidays including New Year’s Day, Independence Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, and Christmas.