Lucy Lippard is a distinguished writer, curator, editor, lecturer, and activist who has long been appreciated for her expansive scholarship and insight, having been one of the first to recognize the dematerialization of the work in art’s movement toward conceptualism as well as an early champion of feminist art. The author of 21 books, curator of 50 exhibitions, cofounder of Printed Matter Inc., the Heresies Collective, Political Art Documentation/Distribution, Artists Call Against U.S. Intervention in Central America, and other artists’ organizations, Lippard has received eight honorary doctorates in fine arts as well as numerous awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Frank Jewett Mather Award for Criticism, two National Endowment for the Arts grants in criticism, the Women’s  Caucus for Art (WCA) Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Bard College Award for Curatorial Excellence. Of Lippard’s book, The Lure of the Local: Senses of Place in a Multicentered Society, Thomas Hine wrote for the New York Times Book Review, “Lippard overwhelms us with the breadth of her reading and the comprehensiveness with which she considers the things that define place. . . . In its final section, The Lure of the Local is revealed as a sort of art book after all. Its intent is to explore the many things that those who make art or who make judgments about art should think about when they consider art that seeks to be ‘contextual,’ ‘site-specific,’ or ‘place making’.” Lippard’s most recent book is Down Country: The Tano of the Galisteo Basin 1250–1782, for which she received the Caroline Bancroft History Prize from the Denver Public Library.

For Tuesday Evenings, Lippard presents Undermining, touching on photography, the new West, development, water, and land art, as she discusses pits and erections (gravel pits and skyscrapers), and more.

Audio FIle: 
Podcast Category: 
Tuesday Evenings
Archived: 
yes
Date: 
Tuesday, April 17, 2012