Kenneth Goldsmith is, among many distinctions, the 2013 inaugural Poet Laureate of The Museum of Modern Art in New York and founding editor of online archive UbuWeb. With eleven books of poetry to his name, Goldsmith’s writing has been called “some of the most exhaustive and beautiful collage work yet produced in poetry” by Publishers Weekly. He was invited to read at President Obama’s “A Celebration of American Poetry” at the White House, where he also held a poetry workshop with First Lady Michelle Obama. In addition to poetry, his book of essays, Uncreative Writing: Managing Language in the Digital Age, won the 2012 Association for the Study of the Arts of the Present Book Prize. An enlightening documentary on Goldsmith’s work, Sucking on Words, was first shown at the British Library in 2007. As a poet, writer, editor, professor, and music critic, Goldsmith acknowledges few boundaries in his practice. With a BFA in sculpture from the Rhode Island School of Design, he has written about, continuously participates in, and is recognized by the visual art world, as demonstrated by his recent inclusion in the 2012 dOCUMENTA (13) with his Letter to Bettina Funcke as part of the event’s 100 Notes – 100 Thoughts book series.

For this Tuesday Evenings, Goldsmith presents “My Career in Poetry or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Institution.”

The Modern is happy to collaborate with The Reading Room in Dallas on this occasion. Each venue offers specific insight into Kenneth Goldsmith’s work as he shares the nature and experiences of his career at the Modern, and reads his own work at The Reading Room. More information can be found at http://thereadingroom-dallas.blogspot.com/.

Cynthia Daignault, a New York painter recognized for her tenacious and poetic spirit, makes work that highly regards its predecessors while honoring the present solitary and unsung moment within nature, technology, and unsuspecting spaces. With a BA from Stanford in 2001, Daignault has had early success with a 2010 MacDowell Colony Fellowship and a 2011 Rema Hort Mann Foundation Grant. Her work was well received in a 2011 solo exhibition at White Columns, and she has published two limited edition artist books, CCTV (2012) and I love you more than one more day (2013). The latter was in conjunction with her show Which is the Sun and Which is the Shadow? at Lisa Cooley in New York. In a review, The New Yorker’s column GOINGS ON ABOUT TOWN: ART suggests, “Take your time with this subtly yearning poet of a painter. Big, creamy oils breed single floating images of windows or shadows or a pale sun in fields of close-toned beige and light-blue strokes. Three hundred and sixty-five small paintings render one-a-day skies in wide-ranging styles and share the title I love you more than one more day. A restive lyricism seethes within cautious formal constraints. The work stammers on the verge of transcendence, as if having forgotten and then just half-remembering some vital thing that it was about to say.” For Tuesday Evenings, Daignault discusses her love of Impressionism and its continued influence, both on conceptual art and her work, in “Lasting Impressions: following in the footsteps of the Impressionists in contemporary painting.”

Triple Canopy is a magazine based in New York. Since 2007, Triple Canopy has advanced a model for publication that encompasses digital works of art and literature, public conversations, exhibitions, and books. This model hinges on the development of publishing systems that incorporate networked forms of production and circulation. Working closely with artists, writers, technologists, and designers, Triple Canopy produces projects that demand considered reading and viewing. Last summer, as part of the MoMA PS1 exhibition EXPO 1: New York, Triple Canopy organized Speculations (“The Future is ________”), an installation and fifty-day series of presentations, discussions, and performances in which artists, writers, technologists, economists, academics, activists, and economists were invited to place speculative bets on the future. Triple Canopy’s resistance to the atomization of culture and efforts to enrich the public sphere through sustained inquiry and creative research, have set apart the magazine and earned it much recognition and praise. Most recently, Triple Canopy was selected to participate in the Whitney Museum of American Art’s 2014 Biennial, opening March 7. Such a distinction is unusual for a magazine, but comes as no surprise given Triple Canopy’s unbridled enthusiasm, intelligence, and confidence in its many endeavors at the intersection of visual art, literature, criticism, publishing, curating, and technology. For this Tuesday Evenings presentation, Triple Canopy editors Lucy Ives and Alexander Provan discuss Pointing Machines, the magazine’s project for the 2014 Whitney Biennial.

HOMECOMING! Committee is an assembly of artists and creatives who seek to develop collaborative projects in conjunction with their individual artistic production, establishing initiatives and venues in which all manner of creative individuals can operate as co-collaborators. This relational aesthetics-like program has proven successful. The group’s first endeavor, Launch Party in 2011, set into motion what has been a flourishing exhibition and event schedule. Recently their activities have included Post Communiqué at the Dallas Museum of Art in 2013, an exhibition of faux historical displays, data, and performance meant to “blur the lines between historical fact and fictitious narrative” and questioning institutional trust as it applies to the museum as a whole; as well as being selected to participate in the 2013 Texas Biennial with Friskt kopplat, hälften brunnet (Quickly connected, half burned), an exhibition of IKEA furniture repurposed into art crates which fulfills its purpose by being shown in Sweden before going to Torsvik in Jönköping for “final waste to energy incineration.” Each HOMECOMING! Committee initiative is interactive and participatory with the generative intent of “creating an environment to springboard artists into action and build networks for future collaborations, fortifying creative resources to reposition the artist as an individual shaping cultural discourse rather than merely reacting to it.” Moderated by the Modern’s Curator of Education and artist Terri Thornton, members of HOMECOMING! Committee present the trajectory of their collaborative projects to date and beyond for this Tuesday Evenings presentation titled “In Brief.”

HOMECOMING! Committee includes: Christopher Bond, Bradly Brown, Ryan Goolsby, Courtney Hamilton, Timothy Harding, Shelby Meier, Devon Nowlin, Kris Pierce, Gregory Ruppe, Alden Williams, Briana Williams, and Tiffany Wolf.

Michael Petry presents “Nature Morte: Contemporary artists reinvigorate the Still-Life tradition” in conjunction with the publication of his new book by the same title. Dr. Michael Petry was born in Texas, but has lived in London since 1981. With a PhD in Arts from Middlesex University, Petry has diligently investigated art from various angles as an artist, author, co-founder of the Museum of Installation in London, and Director of the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA), London. He was Guest Curator at the Kunstakademiet in Oslo, Research Fellow at the University of Wolverhampton, and Curator of London’s Royal Academy Schools Gallery, and is a Fellow of the Royal British Society of Sculptors (FRBS) and a Brother of the Art Workers’ Guild. For this Tuesday Evenings presentation, Petry shares his findings, observations, and thoughts on the timeless themes of life, death, and passage of time in the work of contemporary artists who are revisiting the age-old tradition of still life.

Come early for a book signing of Nature Morte: Contemporary artists reinvigorate the Still-Life tradition at 6 pm.

 

Stefan Kalmár, Executive Director/Curator, and Richard Birkett, Curator of Artists Space, a nonprofit art gallery and arts organization founded in New York by arts administrator Trudie Grace and critic Irving Sandler in 1972, share their insights into the history and current life of this alternative space that continues to set the bar. As Roberta Smith of the New York Times has proclaimed, “True to its word, Artists Space provides alternatives; they constantly bring to our attention things that for one reason or another are being missed. They remind us that there are other things going on than what is presented by more established institutions.” Artists Space has changed the institutional and economic landscape for contemporary art by lending support to emerging artists and emerging ideas alike, often critically challenging and controversially contributing to the intellectual and artistic status quo in New York City and beyond. The site of provocative discussion and experimentation within contemporary artistic debate, regarding issues including the postmodern image, identity politics, institutional critique, and the AIDS Crisis, Artists Space facilitates between local and global critical dialogue. The current exhibition, Macho Man, Tell It To My Heart: Collected By Julie Ault, suggests Artists Space’s mission through the genuine and time capsule-like collection of the artist, writer, and curator Julie Ault, which was aptly described as “a portrait, in objects, not just of one person but of many; the diary of an era that valued community as retold in a time that doesn’t. It’s a view of a collection not as a monument carved in stone, but as energy gathering and dispersing, as a page still being written on” by Holland Cotter in his New York Times review (December 19, 2013).

This special Tuesday Evenings presentation features artist David Bates in conversation with Tyler Green for a live-audience taping of an episode of the Modern Art Notes Podcast.

David Bates is the renowned Dallas-based artist whose work is the subject of David Bates, a two-part exhibition presented jointly by the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth and Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas. Early in his career, Bates attended the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Independent Study Program before completing a Masters of Fine Art at Southern Methodist University and returning to Texas to make his work and build his career. Almost a decade after his return to this region, Bates was included in the prestigious 1987 Whitney Biennial for his renowned ability to capture the essence of his subjects and transport his viewers, qualities still evident in the artist’s materially conscious paintings, drawings, reliefs, and sculptures.

Modern Art Notes is a production of and wholly owned by Modern Art Notes Media and is enabled by advertising from over a dozen art museums, including The Museum of Modern Art, the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, and the J. Paul Getty Museum. The Modern Art Notes Podcast, which is released each Thursday at noon ET, is available on Modern Art Notes, MANPodcast.com, iTunes, SoundCloud, and wherever podcasts are downloaded.

Fred Tomaselli, featured in the Modern’s special exhibition FOCUS: Fred Tomaselli, is renowned as one of the premiere artists of today. In this Tuesday Evenings presentation, he shares ideas and work that span his career and brings us to his current endeavors. As a central figure in the 1970s punk rock and hallucinogenic counter culture, Tomaselli began making visually dynamic and conceptually loaded collages, photomontages, and paintings, eventually developing a reputation for his inclusion of pharmaceuticals, cannabis leaves, and other mind-altering substances suspended in resin as elements within collaged and painted images. In the recent interview “Better Living Through Chemistry: Fred Tomaselli's Psychedelic Art” for The Artery, the artist explains that it has been years since he’s included drugs in his work, but his themes of utopian notions nevertheless prevail. As curator of FOCUS: Fred Tomaselli, Alison Hearst writes of the work, “Tomaselli’s scenes bend reality, illustrating age-old utopian and transcendental ambitions of art.”

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on special exhibitions, with artists, curators, art historians, and writers holding conversations in the galleries. This program is free and begins at 1 pm on the first Sunday of selected months. In conjunction with México Inside Out: Themes in Art Since 1990, these special gallery talks feature artists included in the exhibition.

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