Martin Gayford, the British critic, writer, and curator, is "the man in a blue scarf." As a prominent sitter for Freud and the subject of the painting Man in a Blue Scarf, 2004, Gayford wrote of his experience in the 2010 book Man with a Blue Scarf: On Sitting for a Portrait by Lucian Freud. For Tuesday Evenings at the Modern, Gayford shares what he observed throughout his extended sittings and the relationship that he inevitably developed with the artist. 

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. Artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Rosson Crow lives and works in Los Angeles, California. She was raised in North Dallas, attended the School of Visual Arts in New York for her undergraduate degree, then Yale University for her master's degree before settling in L.A. In 2009, Crow had her first solo exhibition in the United States here at the Modern, titled Focus: Rosson Crow, from which the museum acquired Sharp's Rifle Shop, 2009. First attracting attention as a graduate student at Yale making large-scale, edgy, irreverent, and raucous paintings, Crow has built a substantial international exhibition record including her 2009 exhibition Texas Crude at White Cube in London and, most recently, Ballyhoo Hullabaloo-Haboob at Honor Fraser in Los Angeles. For Tuesday Evenings, Rosson Crow shares thoughts on her work and career.

An internationally recognized photographer, Nicholas Nixon has helped shape the dialogue of photographic discourse for over four decades. His work gained broad attention when it was included in one of the most influential exhibitions of the 1970s, New Topographics: Photographs of a Man-Altered Landscape at the George Eastman House in 1975. His first solo museum exhibition in 1976 was curated by John Szarkowski at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

 

Nixon has explored a vast range of subject matter, including the changing urban landscape in and around Boston, as well as portraits of people who live there. His camera has captured intimate portraits of people in nursing homes, the blind, sick, and dying. He has also included his family in this revealing visual biography of people who have inspired him.

 

In 1975, Nixon began one of his most famous ongoing projects entitled The Brown Sisters, Truro, Massachusetts. The series consists of an annual portrait of his wife and her three sisters, consistently posed in the same left-to-right order. To date there are 38 portraits in all, tracking time through the faces of his family. The entire series of this critically acclaimed project is in the collection of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. Nixon will discuss the development of this and other photographic projects with the Museum's Chief Curator, Michael Auping.

David Dawson, painter and longtime assistant and friend of Lucian Freud, shares personal insights and thoughts on his 20-year relationship with the brilliant and driven artist for this Tuesday Evenings at the Modern. Photographing Freud and his studio over the years, Dawson explained to the Guardian that his photographic documentation was an “honest record” of their relationship, commenting that working with Freud was “never a burden, but certainly a commitment.”

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. Artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Philip Van Keuren, professor of art and director of the Pollock Gallery for the Division of Art at SMU
Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on Lucian Freud: Portraits, with artists, curators, art historians, and writers holding conversations in the galleries. This special program is free and begins at 1 pm on the first Sunday of the month.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. Artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. Artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries. This special program is free and begins at 1 pm on the first Sunday of most months.

In conjunction with Glenn Ligon: America, a distinguished panel of scholars from various fields and art disciplines will discuss ideas presented in José Esteban Muñoz's 1996 book Disidentifications: Queers of Color and the Performance of Politics, described by the University of Minnesota Press as "an important perspective on the ways outsiders negotiate mainstream culture." As a member of the panel, Mr. Muñoz will share his personal insights and ideas along with fellow panelists: moderator, Noah Simblist, an artist, Southern Methodist University professor of Art who recently co-curated Queer States at the Visual Arts Center at the University of Texas, Austin; Annette Lawrence, an internationally recognized artist based in North Texas and assistant professor of painting and drawing at University of North Texas; Roberto Tejada, a poet, critic, curator, editor, and Southern Methodist University's Distinguished Endowed Chair of Art History; and Rose Pulliam of Allgo, a Texas support organization for queer people of color based in Austin. Join us for this unique opportunity on May 1, 2012, 7 to 8:30 pm in the Modern's auditorium. This program is free and open to the public, but tickets should be picked up at the information desk to assure seating.

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