Each Sunday throughout the run of Andy Warhol: The Last Decade, accomplished artist living and working in the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex offer unique thoughts on the artist, his work, and his contributions as they put this special exhibition into context based on their own particular perspectives as artists.

Each Sunday throughout the run of Andy Warhol: The Last Decade, accomplished artist living and working in the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex offer unique thoughts on the artist, his work, and his contributions as they put this special exhibition into context based on their own particular perspectives as artists.

Each Sunday throughout the run of Andy Warhol: The Last Decade, accomplished artist living and working in the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex offer unique thoughts on the artist, his work, and his contributions as they put this special exhibition into context based on their own particular perspectives as artists.

In conjunction with Andy Warhol: The Last Decade, Dr. Mark Thistlethwaite, the Kay and Velma Kimbell Chair of Art History at Texas Christian University, offers four lectures on the artist who many consider the most important of the later twentieth century.

Each Sunday throughout the run of Andy Warhol: The Last Decade, accomplished artist living and working in the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex offer unique thoughts on the artist, his work, and his contributions as they put this special exhibition into context based on their own particular perspectives as artists.

In conjunction with Andy Warhol: The Last Decade, Dr. Mark Thistlethwaite, the Kay and Velma Kimbell Chair of Art History at Texas Christian University, offers four lectures on the artist who many consider the most important of the later twentieth century.

Ben Jones is an interdisciplinary artist based in New York whose tantalizing work is featured in the Modern’s third FOCUS exhibition of the season. Jones, a member of the East Coast Art Collective, Paper Rad, has received recognition with an impressive exhibition, performance, and publication record for what is described in the press release for his solo exhibition The New Dark Age at Deitch Projects in New York as, “between-media video sculpture, light painting, and ‘drawing in the digital age’” that “explores new methods of pictorial storytelling...” As with the work in The New Dark Age, Jones tends to blow the viewer away with an onslaught of imagery, pattern, and color that replicate and play with the visual bombardment of the contemporary world. As the Deitch Projects press release aptly explains, “To the naked eye, The New Dark Age might be a blinding glimpse at the darkly comic heart of the ‘Internet generation gone wild.’” This Tuesday Evening presentation offers a special preview of what Jones has in-store for the Modern’s audience with the Museum’s final FOCUS exhibition which opens to the public Sunday, April 11, 2009.

Each Sunday throughout the run of Andy Warhol: The Last Decade, accomplished artist living and working in the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex offer unique thoughts on the artist, his work, and his contributions as they put this special exhibition into context based on their own particular perspectives as artists.

In conjunction with Andy Warhol: The Last Decade, Dr. Mark Thistlethwaite, the Kay and Velma Kimbell Chair of Art History at Texas Christian University, offers four lectures on the artist who many consider the most important of the later twentieth century.

Kenneth Goldsmith, a New York-based poet whose writing has been described as, “some of the most exhaustive and beautiful collage work yet produced in poetry” by Publishers Weekly, is founding editor of the online archive UbuWeb (ubu.com), and among other endeavors, is also the editor of I'll Be Your Mirror: The Selected Andy Warhol Interviews, which was the basis for the opera, “Trans-Warhol”, that premiered in Geneva in 2007. While the exhibition Andy Warhol: The Last Decade focuses on the artist’s paintings, Goldsmith’s Tuesday Evenings presentation, The Hyperlinked Warhol: The Artist as King of Media, highlights other activities that Warhol was involved in toward the end of his life, including forays into cable and network television, fashion modeling, advertising, and computer art. This lecture fleshes out the full spectrum of what it meant to be Andy Warhol at the end of his life. What emerges is a portrait of the artist as media visionary, one who, nearly three decades ago, accurately predicted our current infatuation with technology, celebrity, and social networking.

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