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Oct 04, 2016

Merris’ sensibility is as organic and fluid as it is rigorous, as filled with wonder as it is informed by a sense of scientific reason, and it consistently navigates between such positions, seeing them not as oppositional, but naturally and intimately connected.

Dean Daderko, 2014

Sep 27, 2016

Kandel’s new book “The Age of Insight: The Quest to Understand the Unconscious in Art, Mind and Brain” takes us back to turn-of-the-century Vienna, the place of his birth, and he writes about the salons there, where artists could mingle with writers and physicians and scientists. . . . But this isn't just an art history book. Kandel also gets deep into the science of the mind, what happens in the brain when we see a beautiful work of art, how it affects our emotions, how we recognize objects and faces, too. It is written by a neuroscientist, after all.

Sep 20, 2016

“Our space program is handmade,” Mr. Sachs explains, “guided by the philosophy of bricolage.”

Sep 13, 2016

My biggest challenge in writing this book has been to leave the series as free as Stella leaves the novel. Before I could set it free however, I had to take it in, to see and to know its proliferating parts. Robert K. Wallace, from “Pictorial Voyage, More Than Meets the Eye” in Frank Stella’s Moby-Dick: Words and Shapes

May 17, 2016


To form something from nearly nothing, to obtain meaning by shaping, is what this picture promises.
Thomas Demand, referring to a photograph of Henri Matisse in his studio, “Thomas Demand on Matisse,” Tate Etc. 31 (Summer 2014)

Apr 19, 2016

What is a word for collaboration between material will and human intention that implies generation rather than decay?
Martha Tuttle, artist statement

Apr 12, 2016

April 12 - Frank Stella, artist featured in Frank Stella: A Retrospective, in conversation with Modern Chief Curator Michael Auping

Apr 05, 2016

Minus the gold leaf, they function like pictures with pronounced textual elements — in other words, illustrated manuscripts for the 21st century.
Christian Viveros-Fauné, “Fernando Bryce, One-of-a Kind Copyist, On View in Chelsea,” Village Voice, December 15, 2015.

Mar 29, 2016

What persists is an understated elegance and a sensitivity to gesture, color, and composition in fragmentary pictures: a silhouetted figure, a masked face, a veined arm. Presented in an oval format . . . the images might have been spied through a keyhole, and their Old Master allusiveness isn’t contradicted by the suggestion of dust and sweat.
New Yorker
, review of Arne Svenson: The Workers at Julie Saul Gallery, 2015

Mar 22, 2016
Pensato’s stark colors, economy of form, and distortion still leave her prototypes recognizable, though their features are often hollow and masklike. Her versions of these characters are pushed to the point of being tragicomic clowns, analyzing American notions of physical beauty and the dark underbelly of American culture.                                                                                            
Alison Hearst, Assistant Curator, Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, FOCUS: Joyce Pensato