1966
Josef Albers
Oil on fiberboard
30 3/4 x 30 3/4 inches

One of the most immediately recognizable and influential series of paintings produced in the twentieth century is Josef Albers's Homage to the Square. Beginning the series in 1950, at age 62, Albers was to produce more than a thousand Homage paintings and prints, in four different formats.(1) The works became widely known (one appeared on a 1980 United States postage stamp) and influenced two generations of hard edge and Minimalist art.

1951
Josef Albers
Oil on fiberboard
30 3/4 x 30 3/4 inches
Year Acquired: 1980

One of the most immediately recognizable and influential series of paintings produced in the twentieth century is Josef Albers's Homage to the Square. Beginning the series in 1950, at age 62, Albers was to produce more than a thousand Homage paintings and prints, in four different formats.(1) The works became widely known (one appeared on a 1980 United States postage stamp) and influenced two generations of hard edge and Minimalist art.

1967
Josef Albers
Oil on fiberboard
30 3/4 x 30 3/4 inches

One of the most immediately recognizable and influential series of paintings produced in the twentieth century is Josef Albers's Homage to the Square. Beginning the series in 1950, at age 62, Albers was to produce more than a thousand Homage paintings and prints, in four different formats.(1) The works became widely known (one appeared on a 1980 United States postage stamp) and influenced two generations of hard edge and Minimalist art.

1981
Carl Andre
Steel and copper
Steel squares: each 1/4 x 19 3/4 x 19 3/4 inches, copper slats: each 1/4 x 1 3/16 x 19 3/4 inches, overall: 1/4 x 40 1/2 x 374 inches

A central figure in the development of the movement known as Minimalism, Carl Andre creates art that involves the symmetrical arrangement of units of basic building materials, which he terms "particles" or "elements." Inspired by the elemental nature of Constantin Brancusi's sculpture from the early part of the twentieth century, Andre has pushed sculpture to a kind of ground zero.

1956
Francis Bacon
Oil on canvas
78 x 54 inches
Year Acquired: 2002

As the earliest surviving self-portrait, painted from memory when the artist was forty-seven years old, Self-Portrait, 1956 is a key work within Francis Bacon’s oeuvre. In this painting, Bacon depicts himself with the classic psychological impact that has come to characterize his portraits. He is isolated and hunched over, with asymmetrical features—the right side of his face is harshly raised by comparison with the left side, and the right eye is reduced to a crude circle.

1952
William Baziotes
Oil on canvas
40 1/4 x 60 inches
Year Acquired: 2000

The idea of a phantom is a strong presence in the works of William Baziotes, including the Modern Art Museum's Sea Phantoms, 1952. This painting characterizes his mature style of 1944 to 1962, a time when he created enigmatic landscapes with careful attention to spatial arrangements. Like his early work, Sea Phantoms was inspired by the Surrealists' automatic drawings, but in a subtler way.

1992
Bernd and Hilla Becher
Gelatin silver print
24 x 20 inches
Year Acquired: 1995
1972
Bernd and Hilla Becher
Gelatin silver print, edition 4/5
24 x 20 inches
Year Acquired: 1995
1965/printed 1993
Bernd and Hilla Becher
Gelatin silver print, edition 1/5
24 x 20 inches
Year Acquired: 1995
1984
Bernd and Hilla Becher
Gelatin silver print
24 x 20 inches
Year Acquired: 1995
1982
Bernd and Hilla Becher
Gelatin silver print
24 x 20 inches
Year Acquired: 1995
1970
Lynda Benglis
Acrylic foam
56 1/4 x 53 1/2 x 46 3/16 inches
Year Acquired: 1970

I felt I wanted to define for myself the organic phenomena; what nature itself would suggest to me in sculpture. — Lynda Benglis

1997
Dennis Blagg
Oil on canvas
44 x 121 7/8 inches
Year Acquired: 1998
1947
Bill Bomar
Oil on masonite
25.5 x 29 1/2 x 2 inches
Year Acquired: 1947
2000
Julie Bozzi
Oil on linen
4 x 10 inches
Year Acquired: 2001
2010
Mark Bradford
Mixed media collage on canvas
Overall: 120 x 480 in. (304.8 x 1219.2 cm) Overall (each panel): 120 x 120 in. (304.8 x 304.8 cm)
Year Acquired: 2011
1990-91
Deborah Butterfield
Unique Bronze
80 x 112 x 28 inches
Year Acquired: 1992
1987-88
Anthony Caro
Steel, rusted and waxed
96 x 73 x 63 inches
Year Acquired: 1989
1974
John Chamberlain
Welded painted steel
29 x 45 x 38 inches
Year Acquired: 1975

John Chamberlain's use of auto parts as a material suitable for sculpture, and his use of compression as a technique, came to define the signature elements of the artist's work beginning in the late 1950s. In Scull's Angel, what at first appears as an explosion of violent, uncontained energy is in fact a unitary field of tightly knit, baroque folds of steel.

1989
Barbara Ess
Monochrome color photograph, AP2
73 x 50 inches
Year Acquired: 1995

The Museum's collection includes four large-scale photographs by Barbara Ess, each made in her signature style, using black-and-white film and a simple pinhole camera and then printing on color photographic paper. Her choice of equipment and process makes pictures with a soft focus, especially around the edges. Usually printed with just one earthy color, such as amber or muted blue-black, her images become ambient, shadowy, and flickering.

1995
Vernon Fisher
Oil on blackboard slating on wood
92 7/8 x 93 9/16 inches
Year Acquired: 1995
1963
Dan Flavin
Warm white fluorescent light, edition 2/3
96 inches
Year Acquired: 2002

Although Dan Flavin is invariably described as one of the patriarchs of Minimalist sculpture—along with his colleagues Donald Judd, Sol LeWitt, Carl Andre, and Robert Morris—he has gen

1976
Hamish Fulton
Gelatin silver print
43 3/4 x 99 inches
Year Acquired: 1995
1961
Adolph Gottlieb
Oil on canvas
72 1/4 x 90 1/4 inches
Year Acquired: 1984

Paint quality is meaningless if it does not express quality of feeling.
— Adolph Gottlieb

1985
Nancy Graves
Bronze and stainless steel with polyurethane paint
92 3/4 x 70 x 31 1/2 inches

Nancy Graves established herself as an artist in the late 1960s with an exhibition of realistic, life-size camels. Fabricated out of wood, steel, burlap, polyurethane, animal hide, wax, and oil paint, these sculptures appeared to be taken directly from a natural history museum, and they asserted the artist’s interest in science and history. Graves returned to sculpture in the 1980s after a hiatus dedicated to painting, still interested in science and nature, but far from her camels of the late 1960s.

1952
Philip Guston
Ink on paper
18 x 23 inches
Year Acquired: 1999
1966
Philip Guston
Ink on paper
Unframed: 17 1/2 x 22 3/4 in. (44.45 x 57.79 cm) Framed: 24 1/2 x 29 x 1 1/2 in. (62.23 x 73.66 x 3.81 cm)
Year Acquired: 1999
1965
Philip Guston
Ink on paper
16 1/2 x 23 1/2 inches (41.9 x 59.7 cm)

Philip Guston's fifty-year career stands as a unique allegory of the changing conditions of American art in the latter half of the twentieth century. Evolving an imagery that moved from "Symbolic Realism" to abstraction and back to a searching form of autobiographical figuration in the last decade of his life, Guston engaged each decade as if it needed to be seen anew and the meaning of the moment renegotiated.

1964
Philip Guston
Oil on canvas
69 x 78 inches
Year Acquired: 1999

Philip Guston's fifty-year career stands as a unique allegory of the changing conditions of American art in the latter half of the twentieth century. Evolving an imagery that moved from "Symbolic Realism" to abstraction and back to a searching form of autobiographical figuration in the last decade of his life, Guston engaged each decade as if it needed to be seen anew and the meaning of the moment renegotiated.

1976
Philip Guston
Oil on canvas
80 x 116 inches
Year Acquired: 1994
1968
Philip Guston
Acrylic on panel
30 x 32 inches
Year Acquired: 1999
1968-69
Richard Hamilton
Oil on canvas
26 1/2 x 33 1/4 inches
Year Acquired: 2004

In February 1967, Mick Jagger, the lead singer of the Rolling Stones, was arrested at a party in London on drug-related offenses. Arrested alongside Jagger was the well-known cultural guru Robert Fraser—Richard Hamilton’s art dealer—resulting in a high-profile, media-fueled event. When Jagger and Fraser arrived handcuffed in a police van at the courts for sentencing, press photographers attended in droves. One of the resulting photographs, shot through the van’s window by John Twine, was used by Hamilton in a series of six paintings he titled Swingeing London.

2003
Trenton Doyle Hancock
Mixed media on canvas
Unframed: 97 3/4 × 105 in.
1999
Joseph Havel
Bronze
119 x 56 x 56 inches
Year Acquired: 2001

I'm interested in capturing the ordinary, whether it be an object or a momentary event. I want to make it permanent but make it seem like it isn't.(1) — Joseph Havel

2012
Jenny Holzer
9 LED signs with blue diodes
.85 x 120 x 576 inches
Year Acquired: 2012
2002
Callum Innes
Oil on canvas
97 1/2 x 93 1/2 inches
Year Acquired: 2003

This painting by Callum Innes began as a monochrome, with dense layers of black oil paint covering the middle section of a primed white canvas. What appears as a soft veil of color is actually the remains of a carefully unpainted block of canvas. Taking a turpentine-soaked brush, the artist allowed the solvent to run down the surface of one painted section, leaving a ghostly trail of paint and exposing the support underneath. Innes’s exposed paintings, a series he has explored since the early 1990s, take their specific titles from the color of paint used in their creation.

1968
Robert Irwin
Plastic, lighting
53 5/8 inches diameter
Year Acquired: 1969

Untitled dates from a crucial moment in Robert Irwin’s career when his perception of art, and of perception itself, were being reshaped. His concerns led him in 1966 to the convex disc format, which resulted in the body of work that gained him an international reputation. Irwin has explained that he adopted the circular shape because the traditionally rectilinear format of painting no longer made sense to him.

1986
Ellsworth Kelly
Oil on canvas
122 x 356 inches (installed together)
Year Acquired: 1986
1996
Anselm Kiefer
Emulsion, acrylic, and gold leaf on canvas
130 x 218 3/4 inches (330.2 x 555.6 cm)
1973
Anselm Kiefer
Oil and charcoal on burlap
117 1/2 x 170 1/4 inches
Year Acquired: 1997
1961
Roy Lichtenstein
Oil on canvas
56 1/4 x 42 1/8 inches
Year Acquired: 1982

Roy Lichtenstein’s comics-based compositions rival Andy Warhol’s images of Campbell’s Soup cans and Marilyn Monroe as the best known and most influential examples of Pop art. Lichtenstein’s comic-book paintings, such as Mr. Bellamy, 1961, have attained such renown and familiarity that it is easily forgotten that they were produced only briefly (1961–65) and that, as part of his early Pop work, they provoked tremendous controversy.

1967
Robert Mangold
Oil on masonite
72 x 72 inches
Year Acquired: 2003
1977
Agnes Martin
India ink, graphite, and gesso on canvas
72 x 72 inches
Year Acquired: 2000

Geometry has nothing to do with it. It’s all about finding perfection and perfection can’t be found in something so rigid as geometry. You have to go elsewhere for that, in between the lines.(1)
— Agnes Martin

1965
Agnes Martin
Acrylic and graphite on canvas
72 1/16 x 72 1/8 inches
Year Acquired: 1993

Geometry has nothing to do with it. It’s all about finding perfection and perfection can’t be found in something so rigid as geometry. You have to go elsewhere for that, in between the lines.(1) 
— Agnes Martin

1961
Joan Mitchell
Oil on Canvas
119 3/8 x 79 7/8 x 1 3/4 inches
Year Acquired: 2012
1960
Henry Moore
Bronze with bronze base
50 x 113 x 54 inches
Year Acquired: 2002
2007
Robyn O’Neil
Robyn O’Neil
83 x 166 ¾ inches
Year Acquired: 2012
1966
Claes Oldenburg
Canvas, sewn fabric, cardboard, and broom handles
Dimensions variable, Tube: 150 x 50 inches, Contents: 204 x 12 inches
Year Acquired: 1981
2007
Roxy Paine
Stainless steel
40 x 45 x 28 feet
Year Acquired: 2008
2005
Cornelia Parker
14 silver-plated objects crushed by 250-ton industrial press, metal wire
162 x 19 x 1/4 inches
Year Acquired: 2006

Early in her career, the British sculptor Cornelia Parker avoided the familiar associations of representational objects by creating purely abstract works. At a certain point, however, she began to reverse the process, achieving a form of abstraction instead by removing recognizable items from their fundamental usage or meanings.

1960
Pablo Picasso
Oil on canvas
51 1/4 x 77 1/4 inches
Year Acquired: 1967
1976
Michelangelo Pistoletto
Bronze, mirror
120 x 84 x 47 inches
Year Acquired: 2001
1984
Sylvia Plimack Mangold
Oil on linen
60 x 80 inches
Year Acquired: 2002
1952
Jackson Pollock
Enamel on canvas
56 1/4 x 31 3/4 inches
Year Acquired: 1985

Of all the Abstract Expressionists working in New York in the 1940s and 1950s, Jackson Pollock was undoubtedly the most conspicuous. Even within a radical group that took abstraction to new heights, shifting the attention of the international art world from Paris to New York, Pollock’s mercurial personality and unique mode of painting stood out.

1996
Martin Puryear
Wood (ash and maple)
432 x 22 3/4 (narrowing to 1 1/4 at top) x 3 inches
Year Acquired: 2003

Ladder for Booker T. Washington will not be on view from mid-August, 2013 through mid-Janaury 2014.

What excited me about [the piece] was that the length of it was such that you wouldn’t really be able to tell whether you were looking at something that had been manipulated or whether it was in fact truly receding into space through sheer length. — Martin Puryear

Lia
1944
Dickson Reeder
Oil on canvas
28 5/8 x 23 1/2 inches
Year Acquired: 1945
1961
Milton Resnick
Oil on canvas.
Year Acquired: 1971

“Resnick attempts to reject all outside influence and all thought while in the process of working. He says that painting for him is like “falling”—every security, every tentativism, every unknown flowing between himself and the work. He feels that every preconceived notion about the final appearance of the work must ultimately destroy it. “

Written by Henry Hopkins on the occasion of the exhibition "Milton Resnick: Selected Large Paintings,” 1971

1964
Gerhard Richter
Oil on canvas
57 x 78 1/2 inches
Year Acquired: 1997

If there is a continuity in Richter’s art, it is to be found in a finely-tuned dialectic that counterposes the seemingly irreconcilable opposites of subjective expression and objective analysis, and the mechanical versus the handmade. Richter seldom works directly from a subject, preferring the mediation of a photographic image. A majority of the artist’s imagery (including many of his early abstractions) is derived from photographs, which he has kept in his “atlas,” a vast private archive of photographic images taken by Richter or clipped from newspapers and magazines.

2001
Linda Ridgway
Bronze
108 x 26 x 26 inches, dimensions variable
Year Acquired: 2002
1976
Susan Rothenberg
Acrylic and tempera on canvas
67 x 84 1/8 inches
Year Acquired: 1991
91 1/2 x 112 inches
Susan Rothenberg
Oil on canvas
91 1/2 x 112 inches
1989-90
Susan Rothenberg
Oil on canvas
79 5/8 x 95 1/8 inches
Year Acquired: 1997
1957
Mark Rothko
Oil on canvas
66 x 61 3/4 inches
Year Acquired: 1970

A painting is not a picture of an experience; it is an experience. — Mark Rothko

1980
Ulrich Ruckriem
Texas red granite
Left: 36 3/8 x 43 x 43 1/4 inches, Right: 36 3/8 x 43 3/4 x 43 1/2 inches
Year Acquired: 1981
1964
Ed Ruscha
Oil on canvas
65 x 121 1/2 inches
1971
Lucas Samaras
Cor-ten steel
21 3/4 x 22 x 15 7/8 inches
Year Acquired: 1971
1999
Sean Scully
Oil on linen, two panels
Overall 108 x 132 inches
Year Acquired: 2000
1983
Sean Scully
Oil on canvas, two panels
Overall 115 x 96 inches
Year Acquired: 2002
1979
Sean Scully
Oil on canvas, two panels
84 x 84 inches
Year Acquired: 2002
1995
Sean Scully
Oil on canvas, three panels
114 x 180 inches
Year Acquired: 2002
1996
Sean Scully
Oil on canvas, three panels
96 x 144 inches
Year Acquired: 2002
2002
Richard Serra
Cor-ten steel
67 feet 10 inches x 21 feet 9 inches x 20 feet 10 inches
Year Acquired: 2002
1948
Ben Shahn
Tempera on panel
36 1/8 x 48 1/8 inches
Year Acquired: 1969
2002
Melanie Smith
Single channel video, projection, 1/2 AP (Ed. of 3)
Running Time: 5 minutes, 50 seconds
Year Acquired: 2014
1968
Frank Stella
Polymer and fluorescent polymer paint on canvas
120 1/8 x 181 inches
Year Acquired: 1987
1956
Clyfford Still
Oil on canvas
115 x 104 3/4 inches
Year Acquired: 1968

Among the small and elite group of American artists referred to by Time magazine as The Irascibles, and who made up the groundbreaking movement known as Abstract Expressionism in the 1940s and 1950s, Clyfford Still was arguably the most irascible and vociferous. Among a generation of American artists who were attuned and sensitive to the potential commercial and political exploitation of their art, Still was undoubtedly the most suspicious of institutional culture. He had little need for “middle men” to present his art and ideas.

1988
Donald Sultan
Tar and latex paint on canvas
108 1/8 x 144 1/4 inches
Year Acquired: 1989
2012/2013
Frank Thiel
Chromogenic print face-mounted to Plexiglas
Image: 62 3/4 x 150 in. (159.39 x 381 cm) Sheet: 70 7/8 x 157 1/2 in. (180 x 400 cm) Framed: 73 1/4 x 159 7/8 x 2 3/8 in. (186.06 x 406.08 x 6.03 cm)
Year Acquired: 2014
1997
Cy Twombly
Cy Twombly
65 3/4 x 13 3/4 x 13 3/4 inches
Year Acquired: 1999
1951
Bror Utter
Watercolor on paper
15 1/4 x 18 inches
Undated
Bror Utter
Oil on canvas
Year Acquired: 1957
Undated
Bror Utter
Oil on canvas
20.25 x 24 inches
Year Acquired: 1949
20th Century
Bror Utter
Oil on canvas
19.25 x 30 inches
Year Acquired: 1946
1962
Andy Warhol
Acrylic on canvas
82 x 66 1/4 inches (208.3 x 168.3 cm)
Year Acquired: Collection of the Mo

If you want to know all about Andy Warhol, just look at the surface of my paintings and films and me, and there I am. There’s nothing behind it. — Andy Warhol

1986
Andy Warhol
Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas
108 x 108 inches
Year Acquired: 1998
1953
Charles T. Williams
Welded steel
19 1/4 x 36 1/4 inches
Year Acquired: 1954