Gene and Jerry Jones, owners of the Dallas Cowboys, are in conversation with the Modern’s chief curator, Michael Auping. When conceiving the new Cowboys Stadium, the Jones family sought to create more than a football stadium. The idea was to build a twenty-first-century coliseum that would engage not only sports, but architecture, design, technology, and art. One of the most exciting aspects of the building is its inclusion of a world-class collection of contemporary art, many of the works created specifically for the new building. For this Tuesday Evenings presentation, Stadium Art, Auping, who was part of the advisory committee for the project, talks with the Joneses about their vision and how it came to fruition.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. A variety of artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Lawrence Weiner is one of the foremost figures in Conceptual art, as made clear with the Whitney Museum of American Art’s 2007 retrospective of his work, AS FAR AS THE EYE CAN SEE. For Tuesday Evenings, Weiner presents the work and ideas that have inspired and informed generations of artists and viewers since his 1968 Declaration of Intent: “(1) The artist may construct the piece. (2) The piece may be fabricated. (3) The piece may not be built. [Each being equal and consistent with the intent of the artist, the decision as to condition rests with the receiver upon the occasion of receivership.]” Weiner’s Tuesday Evenings presentation, ONE LUMP TWO LUMPS THREE LUMPS FOUR . . . (after the popular piece in the Museum’s collection) is a tremendous opportunity to learn more about the work of the artist, described in his biography as one who PARTICIPATES IN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE PROJECTS AND EXHIBITIONS IN BOTH THE NEW AND OLD WORLD MAINTAINING THAT: ART IS THE EMPIRICAL FACT OF THE RELATIONSHIPS OF OBJECTS TO OBJECTS IN RELATION TO HUMAN BEINGS AND NOT DEPENDENT UPON HISTORICAL PRECEDENT FOR EITHER USE OR LEGITIMACY.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. A variety of artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

William Bruder, AIA, is an award winning artist/architect whose 40-year-old Phoenix, Arizona-based studio, Will Bruder + Partners, has created a distinctive portfolio of residential, multifamily, and cultural buildings. Bruder’s approach to design has been recognized for its poetic pragmatism and its sculptural use of materials and light in creating original forms and spaces.  For this Tuesday Evenings presentation, Making Architecture in Celebration of People and Place, Bruder focuses on the opportunities and challenges in making architecture that is appropriate for both people and place, architecture that grows from and celebrates in a sustainable way the natural and urban environments that we all inhabit in this ever-changing world.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. A variety of artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Michelle White is a writer for Art Papers, a regional editor of Art Lies, and associate curator at the Menil Collection. At the Menil, White has organized provocative exhibitions, including Lessons from Below: Otabenga Jones and Associates, Imaginary Spaces, and Leaps into the Void: Documents of Nouveau Realist Performance. She is currently organizing a retrospective of the drawings of Richard Serra, which opens at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2011, travels to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and closes at the Menil Collection in Houston in 2012. White’s most recently completed project is an exhibition of the early work of Vija Celmins, co-organized with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and opens at the Menil on November 19, 2010. In conjunction with Vija Celmins: Television and Disaster, 1964–1968, White presents Vija Celmins in the 1960s for this Tuesday Evenings presentation, placing the artist’s early work, including pieces in the Modern’s collection, in the context of the mid-1960s and particularly in the “cool school” of California’s art scene.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. A variety of artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

The Bruce High Quality Foundation, the official arbiter of the estate of Bruce High Quality, is dedicated to the preservation of the legacy of the late social sculptor Bruce High Quality. In the spirit of the life and work of Bruce High Quality, it aspires to invest the experience of public space with wonder, to resurrect art history from the bowels of despair, and to impregnate the institutions of art with the joy of man’s desiring. Operating simultaneously as an artist and arts institution since its founding on September 11, 2001, the Bruce High Quality Foundation presents It’s About Time, a talk covering the paradoxes of working simultaneously as an artist and organization, issues of timelessness, the construction of history, the progress of garbage, the politics of specificity, how to run a free art school, how to get rich, branding, the internet, the auction market from 1973 to present, community spirit, drinking in public, and how to build a better tomorrow.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. A variety of artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

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