May 5, 2011

A lively discussion about what regionalism means to the art world of the 21st century.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. A variety of artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. A variety of artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Simon Lee, a British artist living in Brooklyn, is known for his thoughtful presentations of light projection and the resulting narratives that grow from found imagery and common objects or occurrences in his stunning films, photographs, and performances. For Tuesday Evenings, Lee joins accomplished musician Algis Kizys for a screening of their recently produced Where is the Black Beast?, a spell-binding, episodic film based on CROW: The Life and Songs of the Crow, by poet Ted Hughe, as well as some of Lee’s other works and collaborations with Kizys. A 30-minute Q&A will follow the screenings and presentation, giving the audience an opportunity to inquire about the conceptual and practical processes that produced such compelling work.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. A variety of artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Annie Cohen-Solal is the author of several books pertaining to culture and those who have played a role in forming it. Currently a professor at the French National Center for Scientific Research in Paris and Research Fellow at Tisch School of the Arts, New York University, Cohen-Solal came to New York as the Cultural Counselor to the French Embassy in the United States after her biography on the French existentialist Jean-Paul Sartre, Sartre: A Life, became an international best seller. An encounter with Leo Castelli prompted Cohen-Solal to shift her interest to the art world, resulting in Leo Castelli et Les Siens  (Gallimard, Paris), a critically acclaimed book that went on to win the Artcurial Prize for contemporary books. The American version, Leo and His Circle was published in May 2010. The “acknowledged dean of contemporary art dealers,” as Castelli has been termed, and the author’s experiences that led to Leo & His Circle are the subject of this Tuesday Evening presentation.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. A variety of artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Mary Ellen Carroll is a conceptual artist living and working in New York City and Houston, Texas, whose career, spanning more than 20 years, has focused on a single, fundamental question: What do we consider a work of art? The results are multifarious, provocative, and often wry outpourings in architecture, writing, performance, photography, filmmaking, printmaking, sculpture, and painting that interrogate the relationship between subjectivity, language, and power. Carroll teaches architecture at Rice University in Houston, where she has manifested what she terms her opus, prototype 180, a 10-year project that involves the revolution of a single-family home on its foundation, conceived as a way of making architecture perform. Carroll has received much recognition for her daring and compelling work, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Rockefeller Fellowship, a Pollack/Krasner Award, and most recently, the Artistic Honor Award from the American Institute of Architects in Houston. For Tuesday Evenings, Mary Ellen Carroll presents Architecture is Not Art.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. A variety of artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

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