Andrew Campbell is an art historian and senior lecturer at Texas State University, where he teaches courses on contemporary art, feminism and visual representation, bad taste, film, and graphic novels. For Tuesday Evenings, Campbell presents one facet of his current project, Bound Together, an academic study of gay and lesbian leather communities in the 1970s. In this Valentine’s Day presentation entitled The Practice of Sex, the Work of History/ the Work of Sex, the Practice of History, Campbell—in an effort to engage in the ongoing project of writing contemporary art histories by making sense of a multitude of artists and their practice(s) as well as the expansion of historical LGBTQ visual cultures and communities that might otherwise be deemed too esoteric or stigmatized for study—presents four contemporary artists/collectives (Christian Holstad, Monica Majoli, Dean Sameshima, and A. K. Burns/A. L. Steiner) who refashion source documents from 1970s leather communities in order to comment on the politicized practices of LGBTQ love and sex in the twenty-first century.

*Audience members should note that to fully explore and present his subject, Campbell’s presentation includes mature language, themes, and subject matter.

For this Tuesday Evenings presentation, artist Glenn Ligon is in conversation with curator Scott Rothkopf on the subject of Ligon’s midcareer retrospective Glenn Ligon: AMERICA. Ligon is one of the most important American artists working today, with work spanning painting, sculpture, photography, and film, and exhibitions throughout the United States and Europe, including the 1991 and 1993 Whitney Biennials; Black Male: Representations of Masculinity in Contemporary Art and The American Century: Art and Culture 1900–2000, both at the Whitney; solo exhibitions at the Studio Museum in Harlem; the Kunstverein München, Germany; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; St. Louis Art Museum, Missouri; ICA in Philadelphia; and SFMOMA; as well as the 1997 Venice Biennale and Documenta II. Rothkopf is curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art and curator of Glenn Ligon: AMERICA. Prior to his position at the Whitney, Rothkopf was senior editor at Artforum. Through both positions, Rothkopf has come to know Ligon and his art well, having worked closely with the artist on this retrospective and as editor of Ligon’s book Yourself in the World: Selected Writings and Interviews. Given Ligon and Rothkopf’s relationship, as well as their obvious insight into the exhibition, this is a very special presentation that also serves as a preview for Glenn Ligon: AMERICA, which opens to the public on Sunday, February 12.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. Artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. A variety of artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Katy Siegel is a professor of art history at Hunter College in New York, editor in chief of Art Journal, and a contributing editor to Artforum. She has authored numerous essays on modern and contemporary artists, such as Paul Pfeiffer, Takashi Murakami, Lisa Yuskavage, Bernard Frize, and Mark Bradford. She was the curator of High Times, Hard Times: New York Painting, 1967–1975, and is currently at work on a large, historical painting exhibition for the Wexner Center in 2013. Her most recent books include Since ’45: America and the Making of Contemporary Art, published this spring; and Abstract Expressionism, due out this fall.

The Modern Graduate Series aims to foster and sustain a vibrant, creative dialogue among fine arts and art history graduate students from across the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex.

Michael Auping, chief curator at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, presents Los Angeles:  Light and Space at Land’s Edge, focusing on the unique qualities of light in Southern California and how those qualities have inspired painters, sculptors, and installation artists for decades. What began as painterly replications of light—both abstract (Richard Diebenkorn, John McLaughlin) and representational (Ed Ruscha and Vija Celmins)—evolved into architectural investigations of the phenomenology of light (Robert Irwin, Maria Nordman, and Bruce Nauman). 

 

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. A variety of artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Koki Tanaka, born in Tochigi, Japan, is an artist living in Los Angeles, California. For Tuesday Evenings, he presents the development of his playful and insubordinate art that, as he describes in an interview with Akiko Miki, a curator at Palais de Tokyo, has moved from an interest in “how the exhibition is structured to the ordinary process of making of the work, to how the content is developed.”

 

David Pagel, curator, art critic, and associate professor of art at Claremont University in Claremont, California, presents Getting It Wrong in Just the Right Way: Diebenkorn's West Coastism, addressing the various ways some prominent California artists, including Richard Diebenkorn, have been out of step with prevailing trends and tendencies, often doing things wrong to get their art right.

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