Allan McCollum, an artist featured in Urban Theater: New York Art in the 1980s, became well known in the late 1970s for his series Surrogate Paintings and continues to be recognized for utilizing methods of mass production to render countless unique forms. As seen in his current solo exhibition Perfect Couples at Petzel Gallery in New York, a recurrent theme in McCollum’s work is the fantasy of ubiquitous distribution, what he refers to as “our dreams of things appearing everywhere at once,” as well as his ongoing challenge to our culture’s tendency to favor unique artworks. To view a mass field of McCollum’s individual shapes as images on the wall or objects on the floor is both awesome and perplexing.

With a penchant toward fostering connections and identifying individuality, McCollum has occasionally created works that directly engage communities and has called on individual craftsmen. In addition to conducting interviews and writing about the work of fellow artists, he has participated in collaborations with a variety of artists, including Andrea Fraser, Matt Mullican, Laurie Simmons, and Andrea Zittel.

For Tuesday Evenings, Allan McCollum looks at the persistence and development of ideas and forms over an enduring and impressive career.

Tuesday Evenings at the Modern opens this season with insights into the art and issues of Urban Theater: New York Art in the 1980sDr. Mark Thistlethwaite, Kay and Velma Kimbell Chair of Art History at TCU, directs a panel discussion with the Modern’s Chief Curator Michael Auping, organizer of the exhibition Urban Theater, along with Curator Andrea Karnes and Assistant Curator Alison Hearst, who also contributed essays to the catalogue.

Urban Theater: New York Art in the 1980s presents iconic works to capture the mood, energy, and critical themes that distinguished the art of the time in one of the world’s greatest urban centers. Even now, a quarter-century later, New York art in the 1980s still holds an aura of controversy and glamour.

Sundays with the Modern offers unique perspectives on the Museum’s architecture, permanent collection, and special exhibitions. Artists, art historians, critics, writers, and architects hold conversations and lead tours in the galleries.

Explore the fundamentals of the Modern’s permanent collection through four chronological gallery talks led by scholars in art and art history.

Abstract Expressionism
Explore the fundamentals of the Modern’s permanent collection through these chronological gallery talks led by scholars in art and art history.

Museum docents speak on the artwork of Donald Judd and Martin Puryear.

Museum docents speak about the influence of the West on certain works in the Permanent Collection.

Chief Curtor Michael Auping speaks on the work by Roxy Paine, for docent training.

Perspectives on the Permanent Collection with Modern Docent Pamela Smith